Organisations should ensure their members of staff, paid and voluntary, are trained to recognise child abuse. Training should enable staff to:
•    Identify when children are at risk
•    Take thorough and effective preventive action
•    Respond in the most appropriate way to children who are suspected of being abused
•    Report their concerns appropriately
•    Support children, staff and family members or whānau
•    Recognise their responsibilities about suspected poor practice or possible abuse.
Having staff that are well trained and following sound practices can act as a deterrent to offenders who are seeking work around children, and also minimise any opportunity for potential abuse to occur.
Records of training need to be kept to ensure that training is appropriate and regularly updated.

1. Induction Training

2. Ongoing training and refresher

3. Training budgets and resources

1. Induction Training

To ensure all new employees, trustees or volunteers receive appropriate induction training.

Consider:

 

Examples of Policy Statements:

  • {Your Organisation} recognises that induction training for new employees is critical to the safety of children and all staff whether paid or unpaid will attend induction training on child abuse. They will also be required to attend training to understand and carry out the child protection policy, and their further training needs will be identified.

  • All new staff will undertake an induction programme that requires them to read and understand specific material and information about child abuse.

  • A child protection component will be part of the induction training for the Board of Trustees.

  • All new staff members will attend an informative session where this Child Protection Policy is clearly explained.

  • All staff will read and have a copy of the Child Protection Policy. Reference to the Child Protection Policy will be made on a regular basis in staff meetings and training sessions, so that staff remain familiar with and up to date with the policy statements and procedures.

2. On-going or Refresher Training

Consider:

Examples of Policy Statements:

  • The ability of staff to protect children in their care is critical. All staff will be expected to undertake training in child protection at a level appropriate to their position.  {Your Organisation} will ensure that such knowledge is kept up-to-date and relevant.

  • All staff will be expected to complete basic training covering how to recognise and respond to children affected by child abuse and family violence.

  • {Your Organisation} will have a clear organisation-wide plan of the training programme for all staff in child protection issues.

  • While it is desirable that all staff attend the Child Protection Studies Programme, there will always be a minimum of two staff members who have completed this level of training.

  • Time will be made available on full pay to attend these programmes, and costs will be met by {Your Organisation}.

  • Staff will undertake refresher training every three years.

3. Training budgets and resources

To ensure sufficient time, resources and funding are available to allow appropriate child protection training.

Consider:

Examples of Policy Statements:

  • {Your Organisation} believes that trained staff are essential and will provide time, resources and funding to support this process.

  • The training opportunity is also available to volunteers, and will be undertaken in agreement with the manager.

  • Opportunities for inter-agency training will be made available.

  • The Designated Person for Child Protection will be responsible for overseeing this policy.