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Why Support Child Matters?

Child Matters was created in 1994 to provide a “top of the cliff” approach to child protection and advocacy when there had previously been none in New Zealand.

Since then, we have been advocating for the rights of children and educating and inspiring New Zealanders to make sure that every child flourishes in environments safe from all abuse.

As a registered charitable trust, Child Matters relies greatly on the generosity of many funders and philanthropic trusts, individuals and organisations to continue to undertake this important work, including;


Providing knowledge, skills and confidence to those who are in a position to act to protect children

Many people assume they would know if a child was being abused or what to do if abuse was disclosed. Unfortunately this is not the case. The signs of abuse are often difficult to detect, and the best response is often not straightforward. Sometimes good intentions can be more harmful than helpful.

The role of Child Matters is to educate professionals across a range of sectors, who work with children and families, to increase their skills and knowledge in confidently addressing child protection issues for the children they work with.

Your support will help us to;

-        Deliver nationally recognised child protection training to 2000 professionals working with children annually

-        Deliver community education through seminars and presentations

-        Provide child protection advice and support to those who are worried about a child

-        Advise organisations and businesses on child protection and safe working practices


Empowering communities and business to play their part in ensuring children reach their potential in safe and nurturing environments

From its early days Child Matters has focused not only on education, but on raising awareness of the issue of child abuse and inspiring others to act to protect children.

When Child Matters was formed in the 1990s, there was very little awareness of child abuse and a strong reluctance to talk about it. Child abuse was often hidden or denied, and people frequently refused to believe that it happened in their community.

While more New Zealanders now have a greater understanding of the issue, many still believe that it an issue that affects ‘other people’ and does not affect them directly. However there are currently around one million people living with the immediate and long-term effects of childhood trauma. These effects impact the whole community by adding to the crime rate and the cost of health, as well as contributing to mental health, alcohol and drug abuse issues.

Your support will help us to;

-        Raise awareness of the role we all play in keeping children safe through the annual event ‘Buddy Day’

-        Work collaboratively with communities, organisations and businesses, helping create pathways to take positive action in child protection

-        Provide leadership support and workplace programmes to support corporate social responsibility

-        Develop and engage an online community of child advocates through social media


Influencing a change in society’s attitudes toward child abuse and engaging communities to make the wellbeing of children a priority

 Protecting children requires a combination of knowledge, confidence and commitment to act. A growing part of Child Matters’ work is now involved in changing societal ‘norms’ and inspiring all adults to take responsibility for the wellbeing of all children.

To make that happen Child Matters must change attitudes and beliefs and win the hearts and minds of New Zealanders. As a strong advocate for the rights of children, Child Matters promotes, encourages and supports prevention activities and efforts at the local and national level.

Your support will help us to;

-        Raise understanding and awareness of the issue of child abuse

-        Advocate and lobby for the rights of children by influencing changes in policies and legislation to make New Zealand a safer place for children